Furry Friendzy | Wildlife
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HELPFUL LINKS

WILDLIFE EMERGENCIES

Texas Parks & Wildlife
P: (972) 226-9966
W: www.tpwd.state.tx.us
Texas Parks & Wildlife / Law Enforcement
P: 800-792-GAME x:(4263)

US Fish & Wildlife Service 
P: (505) 248-7889
W: www.fws.gov

WE ARE FURRY FRIENDZY

Wildlife Rehabilitation… What Is It?

Wildlife rehabilitation is the caring of injured, diseased or orphaned wildlife and the subsequent return of healthy animals to their natural environment. As animals come into Furry Friendzy each animal is examined for injuries and is quickly treated, whether it includes veterinary care, medications, feeding, exercise for release or simply a quiet place to recover. We as rehabilitators ease their suffering by caring for them until they can be released back into their natural environment.

Only licensed rehabilitators are allowed to lawfully help wildlife. They must have permits from both state and/or federal wildlife agencies. Wildlife rehabilitation directly and indirectly aids animals by treating those brought to their facilities and through educational programs, which help to change people’s attitudes toward wildlife and to encourage responsible treatment of wildlife.

Some might question the validity of wildlife rehabilitation, saying it is un-natural. But consider this, most wildlife injuries are a direct result of un-natural conditions such as man, poisons, electric wires, automobiles, firearms, pellet guns, traps, mowers, etc.

One example of this is a baby beaver less than 10 days old that had been swept away from its lodge due to development work upstream which in the heavy spring rains caused flash floods. Sometimes animals come in with very disturbing wounds. Some animals come in poisoned; some are injured by automobiles and others injured but left for dead by man.

There are many, many stories like these. We as wildlife rehabilitators are on the front lines between suburban development and natural habitat. Where are these animals to go when their natural livelihoods are taken from them by humans?

If you are interested in helping our cause, volunteer information can be found in the volunteer section of this site or give us a call @ 214 914-2535.